Elizabeth A. Jones

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Elizabeth Jones is responsible for the collection and analysis of the historical documentary data. She has been affiliated and has conducted research with the Research Laboratories of Archaeology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill since 1992. As a researcher in Historical Ecology, she has degrees in history, anthropology and interdisciplinary medieval studies. Her Ph.D. research in the historical demography of the Parish of Uxeau in the research area, went beyond the standard demographic analyses to utilize the parish records for the extraction of land-use data (Jones 2006, 2009). Her work with hand-written parish records dating from the 1630s through the 19th century has made her proficient in early modern French palaeography, and familiar with the archaic words and local usages of language in the research area. She has worked in the local town, départemental and regional archives of the research area since 1995. She directed the collection of the historical documents described above. A very few were available online. A greater number were obtained at the governmental archives. But some were only available in village town halls, their existence unknown even to the local officials in charge of the town records, and only obtained through special permission obtained to explore through files unopened for many decades. She has also been involved in the digitization and extraction of features of the historical maps described above, and so well understands the types of relationships that may be drawn between the maps and the historical data.

Scott Madry

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Dr. Scott Madry

Dr. Scott Madry

Scott Madry leads our geomatics research, integration of data into the GIS database, and GIS-related analyses. Madry is a recognized expert in the development and analysis of regional environmental and cultural GIS databases, including the integration of satellite imagery and field GPS data (Madry 1983, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1991, 2005a, 2005b, 2006, 2007; Madry and Pelton 2010, Madry and Crumley 1990; Madry and Rakos 1996). He has been PI or Co-Investigator on over $6 million in grants and contracts, and has given over 150 technical short courses and educational programs in nearly 30 countries. He was a Fulbright scholar in 1996 and 2010. He was also involved in the founding of the International Space University (ISU) and has served as an ISU faculty member since 1988. He has conducted research in North America and for several years in Africa, as well as having conducted research and having taught in Europe for over 25 years.

 

Tamara Misner

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Tamara Misner received her PhD in 2014 from the Department of Geology and Planetary Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh. Her dissertation, entitled: “Geochemical and lithologic response of an upland watershed over the past 800 years to landscape changes in Southern Burgundy, France,” focuses on the interaction of people and climate over time, and the resulting impacts on the landscape. Her dissertation study is part of the interdisciplinary research work proposed here with the goal of combining a unique local historic (documentary and oral history) and geometric data set with geochemical and biologic information derived from mill- and farm-pond sediment records with the aim of developing regional landscape evolution models for the last ~800 years. Since 2006, Tamara has processed and analyzed geochemical, stable isotopic, and lithologic data from lake sediments for her dissertation. She also has extensive experience compiling and combining disparate data sets into GIS databases. In addition she has utilized ArcGIS, Matlab, and STELLA for analyzing and modeling data. Tamara was awarded a Foreign Language Area Studies scholarship to complete an intensive French Language Course at Middlebury College in Vermont. The language skills she acquired have enabled her to read pertinent French scientific articles as well as better communicate with French speaking collaborators and local farmers in the field. Tamara has also spent four field seasons in the study area installing piezometers, collecting lake sediment cores, tree cores, and surface water samples.

 

Seth Murray

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Dr. Seth Murray

Dr. Seth Murray

Seth Murray is Director of International Studies at North Carolina State University and Teaching Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. Dr. Murray leads the oral history and ethnographic component of this project. He is a native of Tours, in the Central Loire Valley of France. He has conducted research in the study area of Burgundy and in the Basque region of southwestern France and northern Spain since 1999. As an ethnographer, he has expertise in historical ecology, the politics of European agriculture, and in the cultural anthropology of rural France. Murray’s research in Burgundy has investigated the intergenerational changes in environmental and agricultural risk-perception and risk-mitigation strategies among Charollais cattle farmers, particularly as they relate to historical and contemporary water management practices, as well as the relationship between microclimatology and the socio-ecological vulnerability of farmers. In the Basque region, Murray has conducted ethnographic, oral history, and extensive archival research examining the management and use of resources by farmers over the past two centuries, most recently as relates to the expansion of non-agricultural activities into rural mountain areas.

 

Amanda B. Tickner

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Amanda Tickner, a paleoethnobotanist and historical ecologist, is a Research Associate of the Research Laboratories of Archaeology at UNC-CH.  Her research interest is the relationships between plants, people and landscapes. Her PhD project, “Production and Consumption at the Hillfort site of Mont Dardon, Burgundy, France,” looked at macrobotanical remains found at the Iron Age hillfort site to discuss agriculture in the study area. As background for this study she has researched the regional landscape and agrarian practices and has knowledge of the local flora, which allows her to assist in field survey. Also, she assists in building the GIS database and collecting archival materials.